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Girls' Adventures in Math (GAIM) is a themed math competition for upper elementary and middle school girls, followed by strategy-based games.


Check out the GAIM website, and learn more about our organization, by clicking on the link below:

 

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Please make checks payable to Math-M-Addicts New York with reference to Credit Suisse.  
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Math-M-Addicts New York Inc.
P.O. Box 580
322 West 52nd Street
New York, NY 10101-0580

Math-M-Addicts New York Inc. is a 501(c)3 organization and all donations are tax deductible.  EIN# 47-2546603

Tax receipts will be provided from Math-M-Addicts New York for your donation.  Your donation contributes to your department’s Desk Challenge team score!

Check out some GAIM-style questions on our blog!

Pantea sends groups of 8 cavalry units or groups of 10 infantry units into battle. In one battle, she sent exactly 96 units that were either cavalry or infantry.  If she sent more infantry units than cavalry units, how many groups of each were in battle?

Pantea sends groups of 8 cavalry units or groups of 10 infantry units into battle. In one battle, she sent exactly 96 units that were either cavalry or infantry.

If she sent more infantry units than cavalry units, how many groups of each were in battle?

Shirley is in a hall full of Nobel laureates, and finds a mother-daughter duo that each won for Chemistry in separate years-- 1911 and 1935! She counts each year from 1911 until 1935 inclusive, taking as many seconds as the largest power of 2 which divides that year.  For example, if a year is odd, she takes 1 second. If a year is divisible by 2 but not by 4, she takes 2 seconds. If a year is divisible by 4 but not by 8, she takes 4 seconds.  How long does it take her to count all of the years?  Bonus Trivia Question: Who were the mother-daughter Nobel Prize winners?

Shirley is in a hall full of Nobel laureates, and finds a mother-daughter duo that each won for Chemistry in separate years-- 1911 and 1935! She counts each year from 1911 until 1935 inclusive, taking as many seconds as the largest power of 2 which divides that year.
For example, if a year is odd, she takes 1 second. If a year is divisible by 2 but not by 4, she takes 2 seconds. If a year is divisible by 4 but not by 8, she takes 4 seconds.

How long does it take her to count all of the years?

Bonus Trivia Question: Who were the mother-daughter Nobel Prize winners?

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